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What is Medical Coding?


Medical coders are professionals who are responsible for translating the medical information recorded by physicians and other healthcare providers into codes that are used for billing and reimbursement purposes. They play a vital role in the healthcare industry by ensuring that medical claims are processed accurately and efficiently.

Medical coders are responsible for reviewing and analyzing patient medical records, including physician notes and test results, and assigning codes to the diagnoses and procedures described. The codes that are used are based on internationally recognized classification systems, such as the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) and the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes.

Medical coding can be divided into two main categories: diagnostic coding and procedural coding. Diagnostic coding involves assigning codes to the patient's diagnoses, which are the conditions that are being treated. The codes are taken from the ICD, which is updated annually. Procedural coding involves assigning codes to the procedures that were performed, such as surgeries, laboratory tests, and X-rays. The codes are taken from the CPT, which is also updated annually.

Medical coders must be trained and proficient in the use of these coding systems and must be able to accurately assign codes based on the information provided in the patient's medical record. They must also be able to review and analyze medical records in order to identify any missing or incorrect information and work with the healthcare provider to correct it.


Medical coders must also be aware of healthcare compliance also known as coding and billing regulations that are set by government agencies and insurance companies. They must understand how these regulations will affect the way that claims are processed and the reimbursement that will be received. They must ensure that the codes that are assigned are compliant with these regulations.

Medical coders may work in a variety of healthcare settings, including hospitals, physicians' offices, and insurance companies. They may work full-time or part-time, and may work during regular business hours or on a flexible schedule. Many medical coders work remotely and able to work from home.

Certification is available for medical coders, and many employers prefer to hire coders who are certified. Certification is provided by several organizations, including the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC), the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and Medical Coding & Healthcare Compliance (MCHC).

In conclusion, Medical coders are vital members of the healthcare team who play a critical role in the financial success of healthcare providers by ensuring that medical claims are processed accurately and efficiently. They are responsible for translating medical information into codes that are used for billing and reimbursement purposes, and must be well-versed in the use of coding systems and regulations. Medical Coding Training is available at varying levels, including online training, in person classroom training, boot camp form, and even on the job training in some cases. Medical Coding Certification is available for medical coders, and many employers prefer to hire certified coders, due to the rigorous training required.

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